Posts Tagged: community-based

What’s new in the iLab?

Happy first birthday to the Winooski iLab! As we enter our second year of offering students personalized and proficiency-based learning, we are building on our strengths from last year and making adjustments to increase the value of independently-driven learning.

Piloting Virtual Environments and the Flipped Classroom

The traditional foreign language classroom made up of repetitive textbook exercises and oral recitation has evolved in many schools across our country. Madame Drpich is one of the most innovative foreign language teachers using technology in Vermont. She is one of a handful of teachers from the United States involved in VIA: Virtual Intercultural Avenues, a collaborative portal for virtual communication between five schools in the United States, Belgium and France. This is a virtual portal developed by an educator at Essex High School where students and teachers within the participating schools can collaborate on lesson planning, curriculum development, classroom discussions and projects via videoconferencing, email, social media, film and other online communication.

New Community Based Learning Fellow

My experiences last year and my summer research and site visits have shown me that community based learning fosters the 3R’s: relationships, relevance and rigor. I look forward to continuing to learn more about how community based learning can help our communities create more of these authentic learning experiences for our students in the future.

Depth? Richness? Relevance? YES!

Burlington High School is piloting a new school calendar, one that opens up rich opportunities for authentic learning. In this 2012-13 year, first-semester ends before December Break, and second-semester is over before Memorial Day weekend. The “Year End Studies” program (inspired by a similar model at Rutland High School) takes place during the last two-and-a-half weeks of the year.

The Water We Swim In

Every aspect of life carries with it certain unspoken assumptions. (A business meeting, for instance, requires a tucked-in shirt; a movie theater assumes viewers will refrain from talking; a waiting room means cordiality–but rarely conversations–with strangers; and schools require classrooms with walls.) If we are successfully assimilated, we move through our lives without giving these things a second thought. Read more.