Posts Tagged: 21st century learning

At Play with DNA: The Burlington Barcoding Project

Students at Burlington High School got to play with DNA and move learning beyond the textbook for their Genetics class this year. Science teacher Molly Heath came across the Urban Barcoding Project from New York City last year, and it inspired her to look for ways to engage her students with the Burlington community in a similar manner. She applied for grants to fund the right equipment and earned grants through the Vermont Academy of Science and Engineering and the Partnership for Change.

Piloting Virtual Environments and the Flipped Classroom

The traditional foreign language classroom made up of repetitive textbook exercises and oral recitation has evolved in many schools across our country. Madame Drpich is one of the most innovative foreign language teachers using technology in Vermont. She is one of a handful of teachers from the United States involved in VIA: Virtual Intercultural Avenues, a collaborative portal for virtual communication between five schools in the United States, Belgium and France. This is a virtual portal developed by an educator at Essex High School where students and teachers within the participating schools can collaborate on lesson planning, curriculum development, classroom discussions and projects via videoconferencing, email, social media, film and other online communication.

New England’s Gigabit High School

Burlington High School sophomores Forest Elliot and William Sutton and representatives from Partnership for Change joined Mayor Miro Weinberger at a press conference announcing BTV Ignite, Burlington’s partnership with US Ignite at Dealer.com today. US Ignite is a White House initiative supported by the National Science Foundation to advance applications and services for next-generation networks across America.

Soft on Content?

On February second, The Partnership for Change hosted a community learning conversation asking “What do our Graduates Need to Succeed?” at Burlington High School. We invited a number of panelists from government, business, higher education, and local non-profits to respond to this question. Read more.